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Longfield Gardens Blog

New Dahlias and a Sneak Peek at This Year’s Cutting Garden

Posted by Kath LaLiberte on Feb 2, 2017

cutting garden dahlias 1 - Longfield GardensJanuary seemed to last forever. Thankfully it’s now in the rear view window and I can start thinking about what to plant in my cutting garden. As usual, 80% of it will be devoted to dahlias. So the only question is… which ones?

Tubers from most of last year’s favorites are wintering over in my basement and looking fine, so there’s no need for me to order Café au Lait, Labyrinth, Karma Choc or American Dream. Those four will get a full row in the cutting garden, which should leave room for about 20 more dahlias. That may sound like a lot, but when you’re a dahlia addict, it’s not! So here’s a look at the ones that have made the cut.

cutting garden dahlias 2 - Longfield GardensDahlias for an August Wedding

A good friend’s daughter is getting married this summer and I have agreed to grow, cut and arrange the flowers. The bride-to-be requested a classic cream/white color palette, so Café au Lait will be the star, but I’ll also need a supporting cast. For additional dahlias, we have agreed on Colorful Investment, Fleurel and White Onesta. There will also be hydrangeas, fragrant Casablanca and Bafferari Oriental lilies, Italian white sunflowers and the Queen Anne’s lace look-alike, ammi majus (also known as bishop’s flower).

cutting garden dahlias 3 - Longfield GardensA Deep Dive on Dark Dahlias

I love rich, dark-hued flowers, especially when they are burgundy or maroon. Clearly I’m not alone, because these colors are always popular on our website and are also favorites on Pinterest.

There are some truly gorgeous dahlias in this color range. Last year I fell hard for velvety, wine-red Karma Choc. The color is difficult to capture in a photograph and winds up looking redder than it does in person. Try it. You won’t be disappointed!

In addition to Karma Choc, I also plan to grow several other wine-red varieties so I can compare and contrast the colors and well as the flower styles and sizes. These include the classic cactus-style dahlia Nuit d’ Ete and the two-tone dinnerplate Contraste.

cutting garden dahlias 5 - Longfield GardensTrying Some New Varieties

We have nine new dahlias on our website for 2017 (for a total of 85 varieties!). I’ll be growing four of them.

Two are part of the “dark dahlias” project (and are shown above).  The loose flower style of Rip City is less formal than Karma Choc and not as spiky as cactus dahlia Nuit d’ Ete. I  really looking forward to seeing this one.

I’ll also be growing Tartan. It’s a burgundy-maroon bicolor like Contraste, but there’s more white on the petals and the flower has a more tousled look. The loose and informal flower style of Rip City and Tartan is a popular trend in the dahlia world.

cutting garden dahlias 6 - Longfield Gardens

There are not many pastel flowers in my garden, but I think Sweet Surprise will be a good one for the wedding. It’s a perfect match for Colorful Investment, and will be nice for adding just a hint of color to the table arrangements.

Cutting garden dahlias 7 - Longfield Gardens

Another variety that’s new to us this spring is Noordwijks Glorie (also known as Glorie van Noordwijk). Like many of our other new dahlias, this variety isn’t new to market, just new to Longfield Gardens. In fact, it can really be considered an heirloom, since it was introduced more than 50 years ago.

This will be my third season growing this beautiful dahlia and I’m really happy it has made its way onto our website. Don’t think of this flower as yellow. It’s much more nuanced. Think peach, cantaloupe and butterscotch.

Have you ordered your dahlias yet? Customer favorites are always in short supply, so don’t delay. If you have a minute to leave a comment, let me know which varieties you are excited about growing this year.

To get a look at all of our dahlias, click HERE. Want to shop dahlias by color family? We have made it easy by sorting them into Burgundy and Red, Yellow and Orange, Purple and Pink, and White and Cream.

To learn more about growing dahlias, consider reading All About Dahlias, How to Pinch and Stake Dahlias and Dahlias: 8 Great Looks.

Topics: Cut Flowers Dahlias Summer Blooming Flowers

Kathleen LaLiberte has been writing about gardening for more than 30 years from her home in northern Vermont, where she tends a half acre of flowers, vegetables and fruit. She has been working with Longfield Gardens since 2011.

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